Friday, April 13, 2012

Reflections & Musings: Getting out of our own way.

"I am not a human being.
I am dynamite."
-Friedrich Nietzche

Lately, I've noticed that I like to have something "on" around me all the time. Whether it's a streaming news story, a podcast, a video or music, I've wanted noise. This is unusual, as I actually truly enjoy silence. It's how I write best, it's key to meditation, and with so many stories swirling around my head, it's how I can encourage a bit more internal and external peace. 

Having listened to Sherry Turkle chat about how the connections we have to our cell phones are playing a role in the development of modern psychology. She notes the many ways in which this little square in our pocket is creating a yearning for us to be close to others, yet only at arm's distance that we're comfortable with and in ways that we can control. Essentially, we're trying to make life fit into tidy patterns rather than being okay with the inherent unpredictability that is the human existence. I wondered if this need to be close was what my wanting noise was about. Then, during the shower today, it finally clicked! (Btw, 30 Rock did a hilarious skit about how brilliant ideas come about when we step away from what it is we're intently focused on.)

I want the noise, because it prevents me from finding the quiet space to grow into my fullest potential. Right now, Hawk and Lily is doing wonderfully! There are so many great directions in which my business is growing that I'm overjoyed at the opportunities. I'm working with talented individuals to not only make my dreams, but all of our greatest hopes, come true. And, because of all this goodness, I am encountering old habits of self-sabotage.

A lot of us do this. Marianne Williamson and Nelson Mandela have both made references to this trait of human behavior, that we're not afraid of what we can't do; instead, we're intimidated by all of our greatest potential. We wonder if we're truly worthy. We question if we can do it. In the book, Forty Rules of Love - A Novel of Rumi, Shams (the often unknown inspiration for much of Rumi's poetry), shares:

"Fret not where the road will take you. Instead concentrate on the first step. That's the hardest part and that's what you are responsible for. Once you take that step let everything do what it naturally does and the rest will follow. Do not go with the flow. Be the flow."


All we ever really have to worry about is what's right in front of us. And maybe, because it's so simple (which is not to say that it's easy), our brains try to make it more complex. I don't have to worry about the outcome of things. I simply bring my best self forward, however that shows up in this moment today, and then create a clear intention of wanting to be of service, that the rest is a practice of faith and trust and letting go.

I once heard a business philosophy that shared how success comes from follow-through. Just that. Many people have phenomenal ideas, but it's the follow-through that actually transforms thought into reality. We all have the capacity to be great encoded within us, but how we decide to unlock that gift and bring it into the world is up to us.

"I can do this," I tell myself. Every time I brush my teeth, I stand in front of the mirror and look directly into my own eyes and repeat affirmations to myself the way that I would encourage a friend. "I am doing the best that I can in every given moment. I can do this!"

We all have doubts. We all have fears. We all feel alone sometimes. It's part of the human condition, and it's the flip-side to all the other emotions that we also experience... confidence, security, connection. The more that I can admit that I'm just like everyone else, then the more we can all be encouraged to embrace how special we also are.

When one of us thrives, we all thrive.

***

What "noise" are you putting in your own way as an obstacle to your dreams? What secrets do you keep to yourself that you think only you are suffering from? How can you take one step today towards your own power?


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